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Last seen 1 month ago.

— The Ryzen 5 1400 is the entry-level chip from AMD's latest Ryzen 5 series which is aimed at the mainstream market. The 1400 is a budget quad core, 8 threaded CPU with base/boost clocks of 3.2/3.4 GHz. Like most the other non-X Ryzen CPUs the 1400 comes with a decent cooler included in the box (Wraith Stealth in this case). Modestly priced at $169 the 1400 is in direct competition with Intel's recent Kaby Lake dual core, four threaded i3-7350k which runs at a base clock of 4.2GHz. The 1400's 8 threads allow a near 40% lead in multi-core processing, but for single-core tasks the 7350K is 45% faster. The Ryzen 5 1500X commands a $20 premium and offers a 25% increase in effective speed over the 1400. Although the 1400 only has a base clock of 3.2 GHz it should more or less match the 1500X when overclocked. Provided it is overclocked, the 1400 joins the other non-X Ryzen models in offering the best bang for your buck. Users not keen on overclocking would probably do better to consider the 1500X at this price point.

1 month ago.

— The quad core and octa threaded Ryzen 1500X is a sub-$200 chip based on AMD's latest Zen architecture. It is released this month as part of the Ryzen 5 launch – a mid-market range specced out to challenge Intel's i5 series and yield considerably better multi-threaded performance at budget prices. Comparing the i5-7600K shows that the 7600K is 20% faster for single and quad core workloads but looses by 20% for multi-core workloads. The Ryzen 5 line-up also includes the 6 core 12 threaded 1600X. By comparison, the 1500X is 24% less expensive, comes with a Wraith Spire cooler and impressively yields very similar single and quad core performance, but multi-core performance lags 50% behind the 1600X. Both chips can be overclocked, but out the box, the base and boost clock speeds are 3.5GHz and 3.7GHz for the 1500X and 3.6GHz and 4.0GHz for the 1600X. The 1500X is a very reasonable CPU for the money, which thanks to AMD's recent IPC improvements, punches far above its weight for multi-threaded performance by Intel's standards.

1 month ago.

— The Ryzen 5 1600 is one of four new Ryzen 5 processors released this month. Based on the AMD Zen architecture, which is comparable to Intel in terms of IPC, the Ryzen 5 1600 has six cores which is more than the vast majority of games are able to use (most games cannot use more than four cores). Ryzen 5 CPUs offer gamers better value for money than the eight core Ryzen 7 models released last month. With six cores the 1600 is approximately 75% better at multi-threaded tasks than Intel's quad core i5 flagship – the similarly priced i5-7600K, the 1600 however, has 25% lower single and 33% lower quad core scores. The 1600 has stock base/boost clock speeds of 3.2/3.6 GHz and its price tag of $219 includes a cooler. Assuming a modest overclock of 10% brings the 1600 within striking range of the 1600X which is the Ryzen 5 flagship. The 1600X sports stock base/boost clocks of 3.6/4.0 GHz but costs $30 more than the 1600 and ships without a cooler included in the box. The Ryzen 5 1600 is the best value for money six core CPU we have seen to date.

1 month ago.

— The Ryzen 5 1600X is the flagship processor from AMD's latest generation of Ryzen 5 processors which feature the Zen architecture. Following on from last month's release of the Ryzen 7 series, the Ryzen 5 series is positioned as a less expensive mid-performance alternative to Intel's i5 mainstream offerings. Once again, AMD excels in multi-core technology. Like the Ryzen 5 1600, the 1600X features 6 cores and 12 threads, but has roughly 11% higher clock speeds (out of the box) for a 14% premium. Like all Ryzen CPUs the 1600X is unlocked. The 1600X is the only Ryzen 5 CPU with a TDP of 95W, the 1600, 1500X and 1400 all have 50% lower power consumption of 65W. Due to its high thread count, UserBenchmarks show that at stock clocks the 1600X outperforms the i7-7700k on multi-threaded tasks by 23%, but it lags behind by 23% for single and 14% for quad-core performance. The 1600X is priced keenly at $249 so a more appropriate CPU comparison is the i5-7600k where the 1600X wins on stock multi-core by a whopping 81%. The 1600X does represent great value for workstation users that also game but its $30 cheaper sibling, the 1600 (non x version), which includes a cooler and has great overclocking potential out of the box is arguably the the value king in this segment.

1 month ago.

— The AMD Ryzen 7 1700 is the least powerful of three new Ryzen 7 CPUs. The 1700 model has base and turbo clocks of 3.0 and 3.7 GHz respectively. Both of its more expensive siblings, the 1700X and 1800X, have higher clocks but they also have TDPs of 95 watts whereas the 1700 is rated at just 65 watts. Comparing IPC between Ryzen and Kaby Lake shows that Kaby Lake leads by a maximum of 9% which is great news for workstation users as this allows the 1700 to beat Intel's 6850K in multi-core workloads at almost half the price. Although the 1700 has great IPC it's somewhat limited by its relatively low (by Kaby Lake standards) clock speed which holds it back a little in both gaming and desktop workloads. For multi-core workstation use, the Ryzen 7 1700 represents the best value for money we have ever seen.

2 months ago.

— The Ryzen 7 1800X is AMD's flagship Ryzen CPU. Clocked at 3.6 GHz with a turbo frequency of 4.0 GHz (stock) this chip offers a staggering level of multi-core performance. Comparing the 1800X with the Intel i7-6850K shows that the 1800X delivers 25% more multi-core throughput than its more expensive counterpart. Historically AMD's CPU architecture has had a much lower IPC than Intel's and consequently Intel have dominated the CPU market since 2009. Comparing IPC between Intel's Kaby Lake and Ryzen shows a maximum gap of just 9%. A very welcome shake-up of the CPU market will unfold as the remaining Ryzen 5 and Ryzen 3 models are rolled out. For now the 1800X offers workstation users similar processing power to a $1,000 i7-6900K at half the price.

2 months ago.

— The AMD Ryzen 7 1700X isn't due for release until next week but two of our users has already submitted benchmarks. Comparing the quad and single core scores from our samples shows a relative 4.3% boost on the single core score so it’s possible that turbo wasn’t fully engaged (12% turbo boost expected). These preliminary results are seriously impressive as they put Zen’s IPC between 0% and 9% below Intel’s Kaby Lake. Even in the worst case scenario these results are still impressive. Comparing Intel’s $1,000 6900K and the 1700X shows that AMD delivers comparable performance for half the price! A shake-up of the CPU market will unfold as Zen rolls out. If Ryzen CPUs can overclock to 4.6+ GHz they will likely dominate the entire market putting a very welcome end to the monotonous tick-tock of recent years.

3 months ago.
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